Think About IT: Meanness—Not So Difficult

We need no divine empowerment to be harsh.

It seems to me that we do not need the power of Christ in our lives to treat others hurtfully, unkindly, or abruptly dismissively. Christians seem to possess natural abilities sufficient for the task of insensitivity. Of course, even carnal Christians are wise enough to masquerade such strictness as a righteous refusal to compromise, but it is actually a walk in the flesh.

It is the ability to express genuine godly and sacrificial love, longsuffering, graciousness, compassion, and gentle understanding that requires the Holy Spirit. Human righteousness is devoid of biblical love and grace. Biblical grace-righteousness and strength flow from the Holy Spirit.

“Now the deeds of the flesh are evident, which are: immorality, impurity, sensuality, idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, outbursts of anger, disputes, dissensions, factions, envying, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these, of which I forewarn you, just as I have forewarned you, that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God. But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law” (Galatians 5:19-23).

Does Faith Precede or Result from the New Birth? John 3:1-15

To be a consistent Calvinist, a person must believe that the Bible teaches God limits His redemptive love toward His creation and that limited love is more reflective of God being the sum of perfect love than God extending His salvational love to all of His creation.

Of course, the perennial problem with the Calvinist’s perspective is the explicit claims of Scripture to the contrary. The encounter between Jesus and Nicodemus provides an example of God’s universal salvational love and sets the context for probably the most well-known and beloved verse in the Scripture, which explicitly declares God’s universal redemptive love for all of His creation (John 3:16).[1]

I intend to set the context by briefly summarizing vss. 1-13. Then I will note some observations drawn from vss. 14-15. The illustration of vss. 14-15 serves a twofold purpose; first, it provides illumination for properly understanding some of the dialogue between Jesus and Nicodemus in vss. 1-13; second, it serves as Jesus’s chosen introductory and illuminative illustration for vss. 16-21. Continue reading →

Homosexuality: Know the facts

Since the Supreme Court decision to legalize homosexual marriage, no one can escape being affected by this sweeping decision. Citizens must realize what has and is going to continue to happen. As I mentioned in a previous article, the loss of religious liberty may very well prove to be one of the great , if not the greatest, losses to American Citizens.

This article in the Weekly Standard is well worth your time. It is informative, alarming, and I believe foreboding.

Think About IT: Lead Others with Loyalty

Jesus was and is loyal beyond measure, and please don’t ever forget His promise to you and me, “lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:20).

Remember, He knew the pain of disloyalty, for His loyalty had been repaid with disloyalty just as the Psalmist predicted, in reference to Judas, “Even my close friend in whom I trusted, Who ate my bread, Has lifted up his heel against me” (Psalm 41:9).

You can feel the pain in those words. How that must have hurt him because He is truly the loyal one. Though Jesus was hurt deeply by Judas’ betrayal, as you may have been and all loyalists shall be, remember always my dear friend, we extol Jesus not Judas; we follow Jesus, and Judas is followed by none.

“Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed Him” (Matthew 10:4).

Homosexual Marriage: A Change in the Law of Marriage and Religious Freedom

“On Friday, June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled by a 5-4 vote to impose so-called ‘gay marriage’ on all 50 states.” While this decision did not change the nature of true marriage, for only God can do that, it did change the nature of legal marriage, and, tragically, in many minds that is a change in the nature of marriage.

The court’s ruling did considerably degrade the institution of marriage in our culture. Moreover, the court’s decision demonstrated one of the most pronounced, unguarded, and hubristic acts of legislating from the bench and disregard for the Constitution to date (demonstrated in their moral reasoning in the article below). Finally, certainly they set in place a ruling that will perpetuate the dismantling of religious freedom in America. I believe this may prove to be, over the coming decades, the most devastating consequence of the ruling. I think that this moralizing decision will be the genesis of untold clashes between believers and the courts, and, as it stands, a portentous signal regarding the kind of decisions that we might expect from the court.

Dr. Jerry Johnson, Ph. D., President and CEO of National Religious Broadcasters, has written two excellent articles on this ruling, Supreme Shame and Supreme Sham (and one more to come), and reading them both will be well worth your time. Particularly important to note is the biblical guidance for Christians from article one, and the moral, rather than legal, musings of the majority opinion in the second.

When Does the Good Faith Offer Become a Bad Deception?

Calvinists’ commitment to unconditional election along with believing in obeying the Great Commission to evangelize and make disciples (Matthew 28:18-20) necessitates certain auxiliary concepts in order to harmonize these two; the good faith offer is such a concept. The simple explanation is that while the Calvinist is to preach the gospel to all so that God can call out His unconditionally elect, every Calvinist is well aware that much of his gospel proclamation will fall upon the non-elect, who have no more chance of receiving the good news than a beaver does of being happy in a petrified forest. Continue reading →

Think About IT: A Daily Goal Worth Pursuing!

In his Serious Call, William Law exhorts: “Let every day be a day of humility, condescend to all the weaknesses and infirmities of your fellow-creatures, cover their frailties, love their excellencies, encourage their virtues, relieve their wants, rejoice in their prosperities, compassionate in their distress, receive their friendship, overlook their unkindness, forgive their malice, be a servant of servants, condescend to do the lowliest offices of the lowest of mankind.”

Homosexuality “Loving the Homosexual to Healing with Truth”

This article briefly considers homosexuality, both biblically and scientifically. For a more thorough treatment of the subject, you can download my series under the same title at

The Scripture clearly teaches that while all sin is sin, some sins are more sinful than others. Matthew 12:30-32 speaks of the unpardonable sin, in contrast to every other sin which can be forgiven by faith in Christ; Matthew 23:23 speaks of the “weightier provisions of the law;” John 19:11 says that in comparison to Pontius Pilate, Judas has the “greater sin;” James 1:14-15 distinguishes between temptation, lust, conceiving, and sin. Sin can refer to full mental indulgence or the physical carrying out of that which is conceived. While the mental envisioning of say, adultery, is sin, the carrying out of the physical act worsens such sin. To wit, the thought of murdering someone is sin, but the greater sin is to carry such thought to its fullness and commit the physical act of murder. Continue reading →

Think About IT: Avoiding Christian Ugliness

Arrogant spirituality misrepresents Christian conviction.

Arrogance by any of God’s created beings is ugly, but arrogance toward others by Christians is ghoulish indeed since Christians are the recipients of Amazing Grace. Christians are given grace to live and communicate our strong convictions graciously.

“So, as those who have been chosen of God, holy and beloved, put on a heart of compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience; bearing with one another, and forgiving each other, whoever has a complaint against anyone; just as the Lord forgave you, so also should you” (Colossians 3:12-13).