A Response to a Blogger Regarding my post, A Day Is a Day Is a Day of Course: Unless That Day Challenges Evolution! Part I

This is a response to my article published on sbctoday.com, 6/4/14 entitled, A Day Is a Day Is a Day of Course: Unless That Day Challenges Evolution! Part I. I also posted this article on this blog, December 22, 2014. I am sorry about the disconnect. This should have been published sooner. I have a couple more of the responses to this series that I will publish in the next two post.

The blogger wrote:

“My seminary Old Testament prof used to say, ‘The Bible was never meant to be a book of science. For instance, most writers of the Biblical revelation believed the world was flat, and that the sun revolved around the earth. Instead, the Bible is the record of God’s revelation to mankind. There is more truth in the Bible in that reality than we can ever digest, understand, believe, and live.’ We invite all manner of problems when we try to turn it into a book of science.”’ Continue reading →

The Equipping Church: Somewhere Between Fundamentalism & Fluff

The Equipping Church

This is my latest book. The following is from the flap on the hardcover followed from an excerpt from the forward.

To the traditionalist, the present contemporary church model appears irreverently trendy and unacceptably shallow, more influenced by culture than influencing culture. To the ecclesiastically avant-garde—often known as the church growth movement, emergent, or simply contemporary—traditional methods and ideas seem to be out of touch, purposeless, and anachronistic.

In The Equipping Church, author and pastor Ronnie W. Rogers demonstrates that the New Testament church model—neither pragmatic fluff nor sterile traditionalism—is an equipping, engaging, and evangelistic church, which is primarily based upon Matthew 28:18-20 and Ephesians 4:11-16. Rogers believes the contemporary vs. traditional debate should be replaced by asking whether or not a church is substantively equipping believers to honor God with their lives and to advance the kingdom by engaging and evangelizing their world as prescribed by the New Testament.

Rogers sets forth the elements necessary to transition a church from stifling, dead traditionalism or the shallowness often associated with the contemporary model to an equipping church and speaks to those who desire to build New Testament churches that honor God first.

“On rare occasions I read a book that I simply can’t put down until the last page. This is such a book…From his fertile mind, gifted pen, and more than thirty years of pastoral experience, comes a work that everyone in Christian ministry must read. Rogers cuts through the murk of all the discussions and debates about traditional and contemporary ministry approaches.”

David L. Allen, Ph.D.
Dean of the School of Theology
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

Copies are available from the author, contact ronnie@trinitynorman.org, as well as online at Amazon (click the book) and Crossbooks.com, a division of Lifeway.

A Day Is a Day Is a Day of Course: Unless That Day Challenges Evolution! Part I

Genesis has been a battleground for some time, and today is no different. This is particularly true of Genesis 1-3, which is the account of the creation and the fall. When I first began studying the Scripture, I recognized the importance of the first eleven chapters of Genesis, but in retrospect I did not fully appreciate the magnitude of their significance. As I studied other areas of the Scripture and began learning the breadth and depth of God’s revelation, I saw that without the truthfulness and perspicuity of the first eleven chapters of Genesis, every major theme of Scripture lay in jeopardy.

Probably the most hotly debated issue is whether or not the days of Genesis 1 are lunar days or indefinite periods of time or even actual days that are representative of longer periods of time. In other words, did God create the world in six days (closely approximating our days) or is the simple language of Genesis concealing a deeper esoteric meaning only fully revealed to scientists quite apart from the Scripture? Even some evangelical scientists like Hugh Ross, who describes himself as a “progressive creationist,” still accept certain cosmological theories as fact and seek to interpret Genesis through that prism”.[1] Continue reading →

Church Discipline Requires a Tender Heart – Love Not Legalism

A biblical attitude is crucial to the whole process of church discipline. If the attitude of those implementing discipline is not right, then what God designed to be a beautiful act of selfless love is transformed into an ugly act of power, even if all the other instructions are followed to the letter. The offspring of that evil may shortly surface as a disuniting and judgmental spirit in the fellowship, or it may lay dormant until the next attempt to lead the church in discipline and then surface with a vengeance.[1] Continue reading →

Teaching the Basics: Important But Insufficient!

“And Jesus came up and spoke to them, saying, ‘All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth. Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age”’ (Matthew 28:18-20). (underline and embolden added)

Most often, this passage is referenced in order to emphasize missions and evangelism, and those are indeed vital components; however, the teaching task is often, albeit unwittingly, reduced to a secondary or tertiary status. Additionally, the essentialness of the breadth and depth of the teaching component is often obscured by our words and practice. Continue reading →

Think About IT: Finding the Will of God

God’s will is obscured by ungratefulness!

Christians (and many who give great evidence of not being Christians) often opine about knowing the will of God, as if God is hiding it from people. However, it is our ungrateful hearts rather than God that conceals His desires for us.

Any follower of Jesus who truly wants to know the will of God can. It begins by giving thanks.

“In everything give thanks; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus,” 1 Thessalonians 5:18.

Response: Clarification About Election and God’s Sovereignty

The following are responses to comments posted by a blogger on 9/19/2013 on the SBCToday blog, http://sbctoday.com/2013/09/17/rev-ronnie-rogers-responds/ in response to an article entitled “Is Libertarian Free Will Eternal?” This one gets a little deep. The blogger is a knowledgeable Calvinist, and very forthright about Calvinism’s determinism. His comments about my post are emboldened.

You said, “It’s hard to believe that Pastor Rogers’ comments are being celebrated as so definitive. Here is one example of his mistaken logic:”

Then you quote me saying, “Whether one is a Calvinist or not, God being omniscient, He has always known who the elect were, and for anyone to deny that God always knew who would be saved seems beyond the pale of orthodoxy.”

Again, the essence of Calvinism is not the affirmation that God knows who will be saved (the elect), but rather that He unconditionally chose some to salvation and did everything necessary to predetermine that these unconditionally elect would freely choose to believe.”

The following statement is apparently your example of my faulty logic, “While affirming God’s infallible omniscience he denies that God has determined from eternity who is elected.” Continue reading →

The Five Reasons for Church Discipline

I have led churches to practice church discipline for thirty years now, and I do not see that the need is any less today than in years past.

Church discipline can be understood as the biblical attitude and actions of the local church that enable her to preserve her submission to the head of the church in holiness, fellowship, testimony, mission and doctrinal purity, with the purpose of maintaining a conducive atmosphere for following Christ and experiencing His presence and power. Church discipline includes the following purposes: redemption, correction, protection, purification and justice. On a practical level, I would further distinguish between non-formal and formal discipline. Non-formal includes all aspects of the biblical teaching and practical application of church discipline up to public involvement of the full church body in either seeking repentance of the sinning brother or sister or removal from fellowship. Continue reading →

Do the “Doctrines of Grace” Affect Evangelism?

Some Calvinist’s aver that ideas like limited atonement, unconditional election, and selective regeneration really make no difference in the nature of the evangelistic endeavor, i.e. these are tertiary or irrelevant to the proclamation of the gospel. To wit, God being secretly pleased to withhold salvation from a vast proportion of the humanity that He created does not affect the nature of propagating the gospel. Continue reading →